ViolinMan.com 

ViolinMan.com-The easy-to-use Violin Resource

 

VIOLIN FAMILY | KINDS LAND | SEARCH

 

Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

HISTORY                         Composers

Makers

Violin History & Timeline

PERFORMERS

Violin

Viola

Cello

Bass 

Gamba, etc. 

The Roots of Famous Violinists

TEACHERS

Violin

Viola

Cello

Bass   

DEALERS                        

Listings

Specialist

Event 

LUTHERIE

Bibliography

Listings

Gallery

COLLECTING

Identification

Buying

Selling

THE INSTRUMENTS

Violin                                  Viola          Cello                                    Bass                                    Viol                   Bows                                               Tales             

LINKS

Interesting  Sites      

GALLERY

Antique Instruments

Historical Photos


Franz Schubertís presence graced the earth for merely thirty one years. However, in that brief span of time this great composer created a wealth of musical treasures. Schubert was born into a modest family. His father a schoolmaster, encouraged Schubertís love for music, and the local parish choirmaster, Michael Holzer, directed Schubertís study of the viola and the organ, as well as of vocal technique. Schubertís musical abilities grew at a tremendous rate, and at the age of eleven he was admitted into the School of the Imperial and Royal Chapel, where choristers were trained.

Schubert was a shy and timid boy, and life at the school was often difficult. Heating was poor, and food was scarce. Despite its trying physical conditions, the school provided an environment in which Schubert flourished musically. He became proficient on the violin, and spent much of his time happily composing pieces, or playing in the school orchestra. Schubertís teachers were astonished by his musical abilities. He was a stunning violinist, and his first composition, Hagars K/age, greatly impressed Salieri, the Schubertís studies. When Schubertís talents surpassed the teaching skills of Ruczizka, Schubert was transferred to Salieriís class. Salieri continued to direct his musical progress, astonished by Schubertís growing accomplishments.

In 1813 Schubertís voice cracked. As was the custom, he was required to leave the school and return home. Schubert followed in his fatherís footsteps, and after a year of training at the Normal School of St. Anna, he became a teacher. However, Schubert soon found that he detested teaching. A quiet, introverted individual, Schubert did not enjoy directing large classes of students, and paid little attention to the childrenís progress. His mind was filled with musical melodies, and he was unable to focus his attention on other distractions. 1815 was the year in which Schubert began producing his great masterpieces. Supported by Spaun, a close friend from the School of the Imperial and Royal Chapel, Schubert and two other friends formed a group called the "Schubertians".  United by a love for Schubertís music, this group brought encouragement and financial support to the great composer.

Schubertís pieces have continually been acclaimed for their lyrical, beautiful! melodies. Although he composed prolifically, producing masses, symphonies, sonatas, choral works, and operas, Schubert is most renowned for the songs, or Lieder. that he composed. He produced over six hundred Lieder, crafting many of the worldís most beloved melodies. Schubertís facility with multiple instruments enabled him to use the piano as a backdrop for the predominant melodies in his pieces. He obscured the lines between music and poetry, and often set the words of poems to a lovely tune. Ave-Marie is among his masterpieces, and it captures the overwhelming depth of expression that

Although many have been overwhelmed by Schubertís mellifluous music, Schubert himself was in awe of Beethovenís masterpieces. Beethovenís music provided him with life long inspiration. Schubert visited Beethovenís deathbed, honored to be in the presence of such a great composer. On his own deathbed, Schubert demanded that he be buried next to Beethoven. Thus, Schubert lies in the Wahring cemetery, close to the man whose work arouse is own passion or music.

Note by Shanaira Udwadia (May-2001)